Drosophila

Mother’s curse and indirect genetic effects: do males matter to mitochondrial genome evolution?

We argue that the effects of mitochondrial DNA on a male phenotype can respond to selection, provided that males interact with their female 'mitochondrial relatives', and that the male phenotype affects female fitness. We present experimental evidence that female fitness depends on the mitochondrial DNA carried by interacting males, and discuss the implications for 'mother's curse'.

Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive

Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this longstanding puzzle …

Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid can protect the sperm of other males

Many internally‐fertilizing animals produce seminal fluid which is transferred along with sperm during mating. Seminal fluid typically contains a diverse range of chemicals that coordinate sperm storage, moderate sperm motility, provide advantages in …

A sterile sperm caste protects brother fertile sperm from female-mediated death in Drosophila pseudoobscura

Spermicide (i.e., female-mediated sperm death) is an understudied but potentially widespread phenomenon that has important ramifications for the study of sexual conflict, postcopulatory sexual selection, and fertility. Males are predicted to evolve …

What use is an infertile sperm? A comparative test of parasperm function in sperm-heteromorphic Drosophila

Sperm size and number are important determinants of male reproductive success. The genus _Drosophila_ exhibits a remarkable diversity of sperm production strategies, including the production of multiple sperm morphs by individual males, a phenomenon …